Monday, March 27, 2017

It's Monday! What are you reading? - March 27, 2017

So my plan is, each Monday to update anyone who reads this on what I'm currently reading and what I may have finished in the last week.

Currently At Home Book:

Title: If Not for You (New Beginnings #3)
Author: Debbie Macomber
Date Started: March 26

Currently At Lunch Break Book:

Title: Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America
Author: Michael Eric Dyson
Date Started: March 6

Finished Reading:

Title: NextWave, Agents of H.A.T.E.
Author: Warren Ellis
Date Finished: March 17
Stars: 3 Stars
Note: I read the 12 individual issues of the full run. I don't like tracking those as individual reads so I'm tracking them as 1 book.

Monday, March 20, 2017

It's Monday! What are you reading? March 20

So my plan is, each Monday to update anyone who reads this on what I'm currently reading and what I may have finished in the last week.

Currently At Home Book:

Title: NextWave (issues 1-12)
Author: Warren Ellis
Date Started: March 17

Currently At Work Book:

Title: Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America
Author: Michael Eric Dyson
Date Started: March 6

Finished Reading:

Title: Built (Saints of Denver #1)
Author: Jay Crownover
Date Finished: March 7
Stars: 3 Stars

Title: The Tale of the Unknown Island
Author: Jose Saramago
Date Finished: March 9
Stars: 4 Stars

Title: Jane Austen
Author: Carol Shields
Date Finished: March 18
Stars: 4 Stars

Title: Eat This Poem
Author: Nicole Gulotta
Date Finished: March 19
Stars: 4 Stars
Comments: ARC received from NetGalley - Review

Weekend Cooking: Eat This Poem


Title: Eat This Poem
Author: Nicole Gulotta
Publication Date: March 21, 2017
Rating: 4 Stars

Synopsis: A literary cookbook celebrating food and poetry, two of life's essential ingredients.

In the same way that salt seasons ingredients to bring out their flavors, poetry seasons our lives; when celebrated together, our everyday moments and meals are richer and more meaningful. The twenty-five inspiring poems in this book from such poets as Marge Piercy, Louise Gluck, Mark Strand, Mary Oliver, Billy Collins, Jane Hirshfield are accompanied by seventy-five recipes that bring the richness of words to life in our kitchen, on our plate, and through our palate. Eat This Poem opens us up to fresh ways of accessing poetry and lends new meaning to the foods we cook. 

Review: I love cookbooks and have a bad habit of collecting some of the interesting ones I come across. This one will be added to my collection (got a digital copy to review). My love of cooking is growing steadily to match my love of literature and poetry. This book combines poetry, analysis of the poems, stories from the author, and recipes.

Each section of this book has a few poems that connect with the recipes in that section. So a poem about blueberries is followed by a quick analysis from Nicole which then ties into the following recipes. Some of the recipes have stories to explain while Nicole included them in this collection.

In so many cases of the cookbooks I collect (many from celebrity chefs) I don't end up making any of the dishes because they are too 'fancy' for my style of cooking. This book has some of those, but also some easy and simple recipes that will easily find their way into my kitchen.  I'm a member of a CSA and a lot of what I get from the farm this summer will be used to cook from this cookbook. For the few recipes that call for canned items, I was happy to see that her recommended brands can be purchased at my small local grocery store.

If you love poetry and you love cooking, I think this book would make a good addition to your collection.

I received an ebook ARC from NetGalley. 

Friday, March 10, 2017

Peek Inside a Book: Irish Gold


When I was deciding to come back to the blog I was looking through all the blogging memes that the blogs I read follow. I had done Book Beginnings and The Friday 56 a handful of times, but over at Mixed Book Bag, JC merged them together and I really like that idea.  So borrowing from her I'm going to start linking up to both Book Beginnings on Friday from Rose City Reader and The Friday 56 with Freda's Voice.

My little twist to this; I work in a library IT department. We have two offices separated by a section of the fiction stacks.  Books are always catching my eye and I've gotten pretty good about ignoring them, other wise my TBR list would be HUGE.  But these weekly memes give them the chance to see if the book would be worth checking out.


Irish Gold (Nuala Anne McGrail, #1)This week the book is Irish Gold by Andrew M. Greeley :.

It Begins: 
"The Irish," I insisted to the black-haired young woman whose face might have belonged to a pre-Christian Celtic goddess, "are different. They look like some of the rest of us and they speak a language that's remotely like ours. Many of them even have the same names as we do. But they're different - almost like aliens from another planet."


On Page 56:
"What's her name?" Mom demanded happily.

"Nuala Anne McGrail - the first name is short for Fionnuala. She'a a student at TCD, Trinity College, that is, studying to be an accountant but she acts and sings."


Verdict:
This is the first book in the Nuala Ann McGrail series. It's like a cozy mystery series meets a good suspense series. I read this novel a few years ago at the suggestion from a friend's mother who just loved this books.  I remember liking the novel but it's wasn't really my taste in books so I didn't read on in the series.  The thing that really interested me was that Andrew M Greeley was an Irish Catholic Priest from Chicago and he wrote A LOT both fiction and nonfiction and donated his earnings to the Church and other charities. 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Book Review: Why We March


Title: Why We March
Author: Artisan Press
Publication Date: March 7, 2017
Rating: 4 stars

Synopsis: Celebrate the Women’s March with this inspiring collection of 500 images of the most powerful, uplifting, clever, and creative protest signs carried by marchers across the United States and around the world. Organized thematically, the photographs in Why We March--featuring messages about reproductive rights and immigration, cabinet picks and police violence, climate change, and feminism--together paint a striking portrait of the hope, defiance, anger, and passion that sent more than 5 million people into the streets to protest. “Women’s Rights = Human Rights.” “Love Trumps Hate.” “Nasty Women Unite.” “Build Bridges, Not Walls.” These messages are a rallying cry for this burgeoning movement, and this collection will serve as both a valuable encapsulation of this unprecedented moment in political history and a powerful reminder of why we march. All royalties from the sale of this book will be donated to Planned Parenthood.

Review: I marched in Trenton, NJ and one of the highlights of the march were the creative signs. My own pictures from the day are mostly of the signs I saw. This book is a collection of signs from a lot of the larger marches around the world. The book also includes a handful of quotes from some of the speeches from the March on Washington. I wish there had been a few more quotes and I would have liked to see pictures from more marches. 

I recommend buying the book and just leaving it out in your house. The cover makes a statement and invites people to pick it up and flip through. Each photo and quote explains why we marched that day and why we will continue to march. 

I received an ebook ARC from NetGalley.

Monday, March 6, 2017

It's Monday! What are you reading? - March 6

 

So my plan is each Monday to update anyone who reads this on what I'm currently reading and what I may have finished in the last week.

If you saw last week I was reading Born a Crime by Trevor Noah. However, two things happened. First I realized that I started it too late to get it read by its due date back at the library. Second, the more I read, the more I could hear it in his voice and that made me realize I would probably enjoy it more in audiobook more.  So I returned the book to the library and put myself on hold for the audiobook.

Currently At Home Book:
Title: Built
Author: Jaw Crownover
Date Started:  March 5

Currently At Work Book:
Title: Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America
Author: Michael Eric Dyson
Date Started: March 6

Finished Reading:
Title: Thunder and Roses
Author: Mary Jo Putney
Date Finished: February 25
Stars: 4 stars
Comments: Read for February's entry in the Keyword Reading Challenge

Address Unknown
Title: Address Unknown

Author: Katherine Kressmann Taylor
Date Finished: March 3
Stars: 5 stars
Comments: I'm highly recommended this book to everyone. It's short and worth reading right now! It just seems so completely right for the time period. It's time for this short story to be re-re-discovered.

Title: Echoes in Death
Author: J.D. Robb
Date Finished: March 3
Stars: 4 stars

Title: Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: Vol 3
Author: Ryan North, Erica Henderson
Date Finished: March 5
Stars: 4 stars

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Peek Inside a Book: Born a Crime


When I was deciding to come back to the blog I was looking through all the blogging memes that the blogs I read follow. I had done Book Beginnings and The Friday 56 a handful of times, but over at Mixed Book Bag, JC merged them together and I really like that idea.  So borrowing from her I'm going to start linking up to both Book Beginnings on Friday from Rose City Reader and The Friday 56 with Freda's Voice.

This week I'm reading Born a Crime by Trevor Noah and thought it would make a good pick for these prompts.

Born a Crime
Chapter 1 Begins: 
Sometimes in big Hollywood movies they'll have these crazy chase scenes where somebody jumps or gets thrown from a moving car. 

On Page 56:
That, and so many other smaller incidents in my life, made me realize that language, even more than color, defines who you are to people. 

Verdict:
While I'm enjoying reading this book, I'm considering giving up on the book and switching to the audio book.